December 08, 2019

Scientists develop urine-powered fuel cells

According to news from Beijing on the 18th, according to foreign media reports, about 10.5 billion liters of urine are produced every day, which is enough to fill the 4,200 Olympic swimming pools. Although most of us would label it as waste, scientists hope to use urine to power one day and then use it in cars, homes, and cities. A team of scientists from Korea University Korea outlined a plan to use human carbon in the urine to make cheap electricity.

South Korean scientists hope to use human urine to generate electricity and then supply it to cars, houses and cities. They plan to replace the expensive platinum in fuel cells with carbon naturally present in human urine. The photo shows a fuel cell car. This car has nothing to do with the project, but one day it may benefit from this technology.

On the anode, a catalyst, usually platinum, separates the electrons of the hydrogen atoms, leaving positively charged hydrogen ions and free electrons. A membrane between the anode and cathode allows only hydrogen ions to pass through. This means that the electrons only move along the outer circuit, which in turn generates the current.

Scientists hope that fuel cells will have a wide range of applications in the future.

The problem is that the catalyst in the fuel cell is too expensive, and its high cost has now inhibited the commercial development of this technology. But by using platinum in the urine instead of platinum, researchers may significantly reduce costs.

The researchers said they would replace the expensive platinum in the fuel cell with carbon naturally present in human urine. Fuel cells are a promising technology for converting chemical energy into electrical energy through hydrogen and oxygen reactions.

According to this technique, hydrogen is sent to the negative side of the fuel cell, which is negatively charged, while oxygen is sent to the positively charged cathode on the Other side of the fuel cell. On the anode, a catalyst, usually platinum, separates the electrons of the hydrogen atoms, leaving positively-charged hydrogen ions and free electrons. A membrane between the anode and cathode allows only hydrogen ions to pass through. This means that the electrons only move along the outer circuit, which in turn generates the current.

Scientists hope that fuel cells will have a wide range of applications in the future to provide electricity for automobiles and homes. The problem is that the catalyst in the fuel cell is too expensive, and its high cost has now inhibited the commercial development of this technology. But by replacing platinum with carbon with similar properties, Korean researchers believe they may significantly reduce the cost of fuel cells.

The head of the research, Jong-Sung Yu of Korea University in Korea, said that treating urine as a commodity rather than a waste would also yield environmental benefits. He said: "The residual traces of drugs such as drugs in the urine will enter the water. Like the fuel cells, the carbon obtained from the urine can also be used in battery applications."

double horizontal mesh

double horizontal mesh,High Quality double horizontal mesh,double horizontal mesh Details

Hebei Giant Metal Technology Co., Ltd. , https://www.wiremesh.pl